This information is about the storage of diesel. (For information on the transportation of diesel, such as placarding, contact the New Zealand Transport Agency).

Types of diesel

The Environmental Protection Authority has approved the following types of diesel:

  • Diesel fuel (automotive gas oil and marine diesel fuel). HSR001441. HSNO classification 3.1D, 6.1E (All), 6.3B, 6.7B, 9.1B (All). (GHS classification - Flammable liquid Category 4, Aspiration hazard Category 1, Carcinogenicity Category 2, Hazardous to the aquatic environment chronic Category 2). UN 3082. Hazchem code 3Z. Diesel fuel is the fuel most commonly used in engines in New Zealand.
  • Low flashpoint diesel (‘low flash’ ‘domestic heating oil’ and ‘alpine diesel’). HSR001447. HSNO classification 3.1C, 6.1E (All), 6.3B, 6.7B, 9.1B (All). (GHS classification - Flammable liquid Category 3, Aspiration hazard Category 1, Carcinogenicity Category 2, Hazardous to the aquatic environment chronic Category 2). UN 1202. Hazchem code 3Y. Low flashpoint diesel is used in particular circumstances, for example as a heating fuel used in locations with low temperatures such as high-altitude ski fields.
  • B21-B99 biodiesel/mineral diesel blends (HSR007902). HSNO classification 3.1D, 6.1E (All), 6.3B, 6.7B, 9.1B (All). (GHS classification - Flammable liquid Category 4, Aspiration hazard Category 1, Carcinogenicity Category 2, Hazardous to the aquatic environment chronic Category 2). This is diesel blended with biodiesel in quantities up to 99 percent.  Biodiesel on its own is non-hazardous, however biodiesel/mineral diesel blends are hazardous substances.  Biodiesel is used in engines and as heating. 

While diesel is not a particularly flammable substance (class 3.1D means that it is a flammable liquid: low hazard, 3.1C is a medium hazard), it is an environmental hazard (9.1B) with considerable clean-up costs if it should leak into a drain, watercourse, or the soil.

Storing diesel

Some of the controls for diesel that may be required include secondary containment, fire extinguishers (none required at unattended service stations for diesel fuel and biodiesel), emergency response plans and stationary container certification (quantity greater than 5,000 litres in an above ground tank). 

A location compliance certificate is not required for diesel. 

Consideration needs to be given to whether the diesel is used in connection with an oil burning installation, an internal combustion engine such as a generator, or a dispenser for retail sale, as this will impact the controls required.

Some of the requirements are varied for diesel stored on farms of more than four hectares.

The Hazardous Substances Calculator(external link) can assist you to determine some of controls for diesel based on the quantity you have in your workplace.